La. Stat. tit. 14 § 43.5

Current with effective legislation from the 2021 Legislative Session
Section 14:43.5 - Intentional exposure to HIV
A. No person shall intentionally expose another to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through sexual contact without the knowing and lawful consent of the victim, if at the time of the exposure the infected person knew he was HIV positive.
B. No person shall intentionally expose another to HIV through any means or contact without the knowing and lawful consent of the victim, if at the time of the exposure the infected person knew he was HIV positive.
C. No person shall intentionally expose a first responder to HIV through any means or contact without the knowing and lawful consent of the first responder when the offender knows at the time of the offense that he is HIV positive, and has reasonable grounds to believe the victim is a first responder acting in the performance of his duty.
D. For purposes of this Section,

"first responder" includes a commissioned police officer, sheriff, deputy sheriff, marshal, deputy marshal, correctional officer, constable, wildlife enforcement agent, and probation and parole officer, any licensed emergency medical services practitioner as defined by R.S. 40:1131, and any firefighter regularly employed by a fire department of any municipality, parish, or fire protection district of the state or any volunteer firefighter of the state.

E.
(1) Whoever commits the crime of intentional exposure to HIV shall be fined not more than five thousand dollars, imprisoned with or without hard labor for not more than ten years, or both.
(2) Whoever commits the crime of intentional exposure to HIV against a first responder shall be fined not more than six thousand dollars, imprisoned with or without hard labor for not more than eleven years, or both.
F.
(1) It is an affirmative defense, if proven by a preponderance of the evidence, that the person exposed to HIV knew the infected person was infected with HIV, knew the action could result in infection with HIV, and gave consent to the action with that knowledge.
(2) It is also an affirmative defense that the transfer of bodily fluid, tissue, or organs occurred after advice from a licensed physician that the accused was noninfectious, and the accused disclosed his HIV-positive status to the victim.
(3) It is also an affirmative defense that the HIV-positive person disclosed his HIV-positive status to the victim, and took practical means to prevent transmission as advised by a physician or other healthcare provider or is a healthcare provider who was following professionally accepted infection control procedures.

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SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

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PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE

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GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF LOUISIANA

APPROVED:_____________________

La. R.S. § 14:43.5

Amended by Acts 2018, No. 427,s. 1, eff. 8/1/2018.
Acts 1987, No. 663, §1; Acts 1993, No. 411, §1.