N.M. Code R. § 3.2.1.18

Current through Register Vol. 33, No. 21, November 8, 2022
Section 3.2.1.18 - GROSS RECEIPTS: SERVICES GENERALLY
A. Receipts from performing a service in New Mexico or performing a service outside New Mexico the product of which is initially used in New Mexico. Receipts derived from performing a service in New Mexico or performing a service outside New Mexico the product of which is initially used in New Mexico are subject to the gross receipts tax unless a specific exemption or deduction provided for in the Gross Receipts and Compensating Tax Act applies.
B. Sales of state licenses by nongovernmental entities:
(1) Amounts retained by nongovernmental entities as compensation for services performed in selling state licenses are gross receipts.
(2) Example: G owns and operates a small grocery store in rural New Mexico which is located near a popular fishing area. As a convenience to the public, G sells New Mexico Game and Fish licenses. For its services in selling these licenses, G retains a small percentage of the total license fee. The amounts retained are gross receipts because they are receipts derived from services performed in New Mexico. G may not deduct the amounts retained pursuant to Section 7-9-66 NMSA 1978 which deals with commissions derived from the sale of tangible personal property not subject to the gross receipts tax. A New Mexico game and fish license is not tangible personal property pursuant to Subsection J of Section 7-9-3 NMSA 1978.
C. Stockbrokers' commissions: Gross receipts include commissions received by stockbrokers for handling transactions. The commissions are receipts from performing a service.
D. Directors' or trustees' fees: Receipts from attending a board of directors or board of trustees meeting in New Mexico are gross receipts from performing services in New Mexico. Receipts from attending a board of directors or board of trustees meeting outside New Mexico are not gross receipts because the initial use of the product of the service is not in New Mexico.
E. Racing receipts:
(1) Unless the receipts are exempt under Section 7-9-40 NMSA 1978:
(a) the receipts of vehicle or animal owners from winning purse money at races held in New Mexico are receipts from performing services in New Mexico and are subject to the gross receipts tax if any charge is made for attending, observing or broadcasting the race.
(b) receipts of vehicle drivers, animal riders and drivers and other persons from receiving a percentage of the owner's purse are receipts from performing services in New Mexico and are subject to the gross receipts tax, unless the person receiving the percentage of purse money is an employee, as that term is defined in 3.2.105.7 NMAC, of the owner.
(2) Where there is an agreement between the driver, rider or other person and the owner for distribution of the winning purse, then only the amount received pursuant to the agreement is gross receipts of the driver, rider or other person receiving the distribution.
(3) Racetrack operators. Receipts of operators of racetracks other than horse racetracks, from gate admission fees and entrance fees paid by drivers are subject to the gross receipts tax. Any portion of these fees paid out by the operator as prizes are not exempt or deductible since the payments are part of the operator's cost of doing business.
F. Advertising services: The service of advertising is performed and initially used at the location of the intended recipient or viewer regardless of where related services may be performed or the location of the advertiser who purchases the advertising services.
(1) Advertising receipts of a newspaper or broadcaster. The receipts of a New Mexico newspaper or a person engaged in the business of radio or television broadcasting from performing advertising services in New Mexico do not include the customary commission paid to or received by a nonemployee advertising agency or a nonemployee solicitation representative, when said advertising services are performed pursuant to an allocation or apportionment agreement entered into between them prior to the date of payment.
(2) Advertising space in pamphlets. Receipts from selling advertising service to New Mexico merchants in a pamphlet printed outside New Mexico and distributed wholly inside New Mexico are receipts from performing an advertising service in New Mexico. Such receipts are subject to the gross receipts tax.
(3) Billboard advertising. Receipts derived from contracts to place advertising on outdoor billboards located within the state of New Mexico are receipts from performing an advertising service in New Mexico. Such receipts are subject to the gross receipts tax, regardless of the location of the advertiser.
G. Day care centers:
(1) Receipts from providing day care are receipts from performing a service and are subject to the gross receipts tax.
(2) Receipts from providing day care for children in a situation where a commercial day care center provides day care for the children and the expenses of the care for some of these children is paid for by the state of New Mexico are subject to the gross receipts tax.
(3) Receipts from providing day care for children in a situation where a person provides day care for children in a residence and the care for all these children is paid for by the state of New Mexico are subject to the gross receipts tax.
(4) Receipts from providing day care for children in a situation where a person provides day care for children in the children's home and the care for all of these children is paid for by the state of New Mexico are subject to the gross receipts tax.
H. Child care:
(1) Receipts derived by a corporation for providing child care facilities for its employees are subject to the gross receipts tax on the amount received from its employees.
(2) Example: The X corporation operates a licensed child care facility to accommodate dependent children of its employees. In order to defray a portion of the cost of the facility, the corporation charges each employee two dollars ($2.00) per child per week for the use of the facility. All receipts from the two-dollar charge per child per week are subject to the gross receipts tax.
I. Service charges; tips:
(1) Except for tips, receipts of hotels, motels, guest lodges, restaurants and other similar establishments from amounts determined by and added to the customer's bill by the establishment for employee services, whether or not such amounts are separately stated on the customer's bill, are gross receipts of the establishment.
(2) A tip is a gratuity offered to service personnel to acknowledge service given. An amount added to a bill by the customer as a tip is a tip. Because the tip is a gratuity, it is not gross receipts.
(3) Amounts denominated as a "tip" but determined by and added to the customer's bill by the establishment may or may not be gross receipts. If the customer is required to pay the added amount and the establishment retains the amount for general business purposes, clearly it is not a gratuity. Amounts retained by the establishment are gross receipts, even if labeled as "tips". If the customer is not required to pay the added amount and any such amounts are distributed entirely to the service personnel, the amounts are tips and not gross receipts of the establishment.
(4) Examples:
(a) Restaurant R has a policy of charging parties of six or more a set percentage of the bill for food and drink served as a tip. If a customer insists on another arrangement, however, the set amount will be removed. R places all amounts collected from the set tip percentage into a pool which is distributed to the service staff at the end of each shift. The amounts designated as tips and collected and distributed by R to the service staff, are tips and not gross receipts. If R retains any amounts derived from the set tip percentage, the amounts retained are gross receipts.
(b) Hotel H rents rooms for banquets and other functions. In addition to the rental fee for the room, H also charges amounts for set-up and post-function cleaning. H retains these amounts for use in its business. These amounts are gross receipts. They are gross receipts even if H denominates them as "tips".
J. Entertainers: The receipts of entertainers or performers of musical, theatrical or similar services in New Mexico are subject to the gross receipts tax.
K. Data access charges: Receipts from fees or charges made in connection with property owned, leased or provided by the person providing the service are subject to the gross receipts tax when the information or data accessed is utilized in this state.
L. Allied company underwriting automotive service contracts: When a New Mexico automotive dealer pays an entity which is allied or affiliated with that dealer (allied company) to undertake all of the dealer's obligations under automotive service contracts as that term is defined in Subsection C of 3.2.1.16 NMAC on which the dealer is promisor, the undertaking of the allied company does not involve the sale of property in New Mexico or the lease of property employed in New Mexico. The undertaking principally involves an obligation of the allied company to indemnify the dealer by paying the dealer for furnishing parts and labor to fulfill the dealer's obligation to furnish the parts and labor. However, the undertaking also involves the performance of services by the allied company for the dealer since the allied company undertakes to handle the claims of automotive service contract purchasers and otherwise perform the dealer's task under the contract. Absent a showing of a different value by the allied company or the department, seven and a half percent of the contract amount paid by the dealer to the allied company will be treated as consideration received for services performed in New Mexico.
M. Custom software:
(1) Receipts derived by a person from developing custom software are receipts from performing a service.
(2) When custom software is developed by a seller for a customer, but the terms of the transaction restrict the customer's ability without the seller's consent to sell the software to another or to authorize another to use the software, the seller's receipts from the customer are receipts from the performance of a service. The seller's receipts from authorizing the customer's sublicensing of the software to another person are receipts from granting a license.
N. Check cashing is a service: Receipts from charges made for cashing checks, money orders and similar instruments by a person other than the person upon whom the check, money order or similar instrument is drawn are receipts from providing a service, not from originating, making or assuming a loan. Such charges are not interest.
O. Receipts of collection agencies:
(1) The fee charged by a collection agency for collecting the accounts of others is gross receipts subject to the gross receipts tax, regardless of whether the receipts of the client are subject to gross receipts tax and regardless of whether the agency is prohibited by law from adding its gross receipts tax amount to the amount collected from the debtor.
(2) Example 1: X is a cash basis taxpayer utilizing the services of Z collection agency for the collection of delinquent accounts receivable. From its New Mexico offices, Z collects from X's New Mexico debtors in the name of X, retains a percentage for its services and turns over the balance to X. The percentage retained by Z is its fee for performing services in New Mexico. The fee is subject to the gross receipts tax. It makes no difference that federal law prohibits Z from passing the cost of the tax to the debtor by adding it to the amount to be collected. X's gross receipts include the full amount collected by Z.
(3) Amounts received by collection agencies from collecting accounts sold to the collection agency are not gross receipts.
(4) Example 2: X, a cash basis taxpayer, sells its delinquent accounts receivable to Z, a collection agency, for a percentage of the face amount of the accounts. X's gross receipts include the full amount of the receivables, excluding any time-price differential. The amount subsequently collected by Z from those accounts, however, is not subject to gross receipts tax because the amount is not included within the definition of gross receipts. In this situation Z is buying and selling intangible property of a type not included within the definition of property in Subsection J of Section 7-9-3 NMSA 1978.
P. Commissions of independent contractors when another pays gross receipts tax on the receipts from the underlying transaction. The following regulations address independent contractors, including commissioned sales agents, who are not consignees or marketplace providers.
(1) Commissions and other consideration received by an independent contractor from performing a sales service in New Mexico with respect to the tangible or intangible personal property of other persons are gross receipts whether or not the other person reports and pays gross receipts tax with respect to the receipts from the sale of the property. This situation involves two separate transactions. The first is the sale of the property by its owner to the customer and the second is the performance of a sales service by the independent contractor for the owner of the property. The receipts from the sale of the property are gross receipts of the person whose property was sold. Receipts, whether in the form of commissions or other remuneration, of the person performing a sales service in New Mexico are gross receipts of the person performing the sales service.
(2) Example 1: S is a national purveyor of tangible personal property. S has stores and employees in New Mexico. S also has catalogue stores in less populated parts of New Mexico. Catalogue stores maintain minimal inventories; their primary purpose is to make S's catalogues available to customers, to take orders of merchandise selected from the catalogues, to place the orders with S and to provide general customer service. The catalogue stores are operated by independent contractors and not by S. S pays the contractors commissions based on the orders placed. In charging its customers, S charges the amount shown in the catalogue and does not add any separate amount to cover the cost of the contractors' commissions. S pays gross receipts tax on its receipts from the sale of catalogue merchandise. The contractors contend that the cost of their selling services is included in the amount S charges for its merchandise and so their commissions are not gross receipts. The contention is erroneous. The contractors have receipts from performing a service in New Mexico; it is immaterial that S paid the amount of gross receipts tax S owed on S's receipts. See, however, the deduction at Subsection B of Section 7-9-66 NMSA 1978.
(3) Example 2: M is a nationwide, multi-level sales company with presence in New Mexico. M sells products to households mainly through a network of individual, independent contractors. The network of sellers is controlled by one or more sets of individuals, also independent contractors, who train and supervise the individuals selling the merchandise; these supervisory contractors may also sell merchandise. The sellers display, promote and take orders for M's products. Payment for orders are sent to M along with the orders. M ships the merchandise directly to the final customers. M has agreed to, and does, pay the gross receipts tax on the retail value of the merchandise sold, whether sold by M or one of the independent contractors. Based on the volume and value of merchandise sold, M pays both the selling and supervisory independent contractors a commission. The commissions received by the independent contractors engaging in business in New Mexico with respect to merchandise sold in New Mexico are gross receipts subject to the gross receipts tax. The commissions are receipts from performing a service in New Mexico. The fact that M pays gross receipts tax on M's receipts from the sale of the property is immaterial in determining the liability of the independent contractors.
(4) Commissions and other consideration received by an independent contractor from performing a sales service in New Mexico with respect to a service to be performed by other persons are gross receipts whether or not the other person reports and pays gross receipts tax with respect to the receipts from the performance of the underlying service. This situation involves two transactions. The first is the performance of the underlying service by the other person for the customer and the second is the performance of the sales service by the independent contractor for the performer of the underlying service. The receipts from the performance of the underlying service for the customer are gross receipts of the person performing that service. Receipts, whether in the form of commissions or other remuneration, of the person performing the sales service are gross receipts of the person performing the sales service.
(5) Example 3: P is the publisher of a magazine published in New Mexico. P enters into arrangements with independent contractors to solicit ads to be placed in P's publication. P pays each contractor a percentage of the billings for the ads placed by the contractor as a commission. The independent contractors claim that they owe no gross receipts tax with respect to ads solicited in New Mexico because P has paid gross receipts tax on P's advertising revenues. The contractors are incorrect. There are two transactions in this situation, P's service of publishing advertisements and the contractors' service of soliciting ads for P. The fact that P paid the amount of gross receipts tax due on P's advertising revenues is immaterial regarding the contractors' gross receipts tax obligations on their receipts.
(6) If the receipts from the underlying sale of the tangible property are exempt or deductible, the commission received by an independent contractor from selling the tangible property of another may be subject to the deduction provided by Section 7-9-66 NMSA 1978.
Q. Consignees and Marketplace Providers: Consignees and marketplace providers have gross receipts from amounts collected by those persons for the sale, lease or license of property or the sale of services to customers as defined under Section 7-9-3.5, regardless of whether the consignee or marketplace provider is obligated to pay the consignor or marketplace seller some part of the amounts collected or whether the contract between the consignee and consignor or the marketplace provider and marketplace seller calls for the consignor or marketplace provider to perform certain services in conjunction with the sale, lease or license of property or the sale of services to the customer. A consignee or marketplace provider will be considered to be selling a separate service for the consignor or marketplace seller only if the contract requires the performance of the service separate and apart from any sale, lease or license of property of stale of a service to the customer.
R. Receipts from winning contest:
(1) Receipts of a contestant from winning purse money in a rodeo or an athletic game, match or tournament held in New Mexico are gross receipts from performing services if any charge is made for attending, observing or broadcasting the event. Such receipts are subject to the gross receipts tax unless an exemption or deduction applies. Where the contestant is a team and there is an agreement among the team members governing distribution of the purse money, then only the amount received by each team member pursuant to the agreement is gross receipts of the team member.
(2) Subsection R of 3.2.1.18 NMAC does not apply to receipts exempt under Section 7-9-40 NMSA 1978 nor does it apply to activities that are primarily or solely gambling.

N.M. Code R. § 3.2.1.18

9/29/67, 12/5/69, 3/3/71, 3/9/72, 11/20/72, 3/20/74, 7/26/76, 3/16/79, 6/18/79, 11/20/79, 4/7/82, 1/6/84, 5/4/84, 10/16/84, 4/2/86, 10/21/86, 6/28/89, 11/26/90, 11/15/96, 1/31/97, 4/30/97; R, 3 NMAC 2.1.18.28, 4/30/97; 3 NMAC 2.1.18.31, 4/30/97; 10/31/97, 7/31/98; R, 4/30/99, 11/15/99, 3.2.1.18 NMAC - Rn & A, 3 NMAC 2.1.18, 10/31/2000; A, 5/31/02; A, 12/30/03; A, 3/15/10; A, 10/15/10; A, 12/14/12, Adopted by New Mexico Register, Volume XXXII, Issue 19, October 13, 2021, eff. 10/13/2021