43 Cited authorities

  1. Skilling v. U.S.

    561 U.S. 358 (2010)   Cited 1,295 times   30 Legal Analyses
    Holding that Honest Services Fraud "covers only bribery and kickback schemes"
  2. Kolender v. Lawson

    461 U.S. 352 (1983)   Cited 2,703 times   5 Legal Analyses
    Holding state misdemeanor statute unconstitutionally vague within the meaning of the Due Process Clause
  3. Chicago v. Morales

    527 U.S. 41 (1999)   Cited 1,106 times   3 Legal Analyses
    Holding that vagueness that "fails to establish standards for the police and public that are sufficient to guard against the arbitrary deprivation of liberty interests" is subject to facial challenge
  4. Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union

    521 U.S. 844 (1997)   Cited 864 times   10 Legal Analyses
    Holding that anti-indecency provisions of the Communications Decency Act violated the First Amendment
  5. McNally v. United States

    483 U.S. 350 (1987)   Cited 1,011 times   16 Legal Analyses
    Holding that the mail fraud statute is "limited in scope to the protection of property rights"
  6. McIntyre v. Ohio Elections Comm'n

    514 U.S. 334 (1995)   Cited 652 times   3 Legal Analyses
    Holding that anonymous speech is constitutionally protected
  7. Sorrell v. IMS Health Inc.

    564 U.S. 552 (2011)   Cited 352 times   59 Legal Analyses
    Holding that state law restricting disclosure of pharmacy records violated First Amendment
  8. Hustler Magazine v. Falwell

    485 U.S. 46 (1988)   Cited 705 times   2 Legal Analyses
    Holding that “public figures and public officials” must prove “actual malice” in addition to falsity before recovering for intentional infliction of emotional distress on the basis of speech directed at them
  9. Smith v. Goguen

    415 U.S. 566 (1974)   Cited 1,136 times   2 Legal Analyses
    Holding statute void-for-vagueness without finding that Goguen's actions constituted protected speech
  10. Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music, Inc.

    510 U.S. 569 (1994)   Cited 512 times   26 Legal Analyses
    Holding that “[i]t was error for the Court of Appeals to conclude that the commercial nature of [a secondary work] rendered it presumptively unfair”
  11. Section 1341 - Frauds and swindles

    18 U.S.C. § 1341   Cited 11,665 times   58 Legal Analyses
    Defining mail fraud
  12. Section 1030 - Fraud and related activity in connection with computers

    18 U.S.C. § 1030   Cited 2,352 times   303 Legal Analyses
    Holding that the statute creates a cause of action against "whoever conspires to commit or attempts to commit" an offense under § 1030, but makes no mention of aiding and abetting liability
  13. Section 1346 - Definition of "scheme or artifice to defraud"

    18 U.S.C. § 1346   Cited 887 times   28 Legal Analyses
    Defining term “ ‘scheme or artifice to defraud’ ” to include “scheme or artifice to deprive another of the intangible right of honest services”
  14. Section 190.25 - Criminal impersonation in the second degree

    N.Y. Penal Law § 190.25   Cited 109 times   1 Legal Analyses

    A person is guilty of criminal impersonation in the second degree when he: 1. Impersonates another and does an act in such assumed character with intent to obtain a benefit or to injure or defraud another; or 2. Pretends to be a representative of some person or organization and does an act in such pretended capacity with intent to obtain a benefit or to injure or defraud another; or 3. (a) Pretends to be a public servant, or wears or displays without authority any uniform, badge, insignia or facsimile

  15. Section 704 - Military medals or decorations

    18 U.S.C. § 704   Cited 65 times   6 Legal Analyses
    Finding that "[f]raudulent claims surrounding the receipt of [military decorations and medals] damage the reputation and meaning of such decorations and medals"
  16. Section 170.05 - Forgery in the third degree

    N.Y. Penal Law § 170.05   Cited 57 times   1 Legal Analyses

    A person is guilty of forgery in the third degree when, with intent to defraud, deceive or injure another, he falsely makes, completes or alters a written instrument. Forgery in the third degree is a class A misdemeanor. N.Y. Penal Law § 170.05

  17. Section 190.79 - Identity theft in the second degree

    N.Y. Penal Law § 190.79   Cited 27 times

    A person is guilty of identify theft in the second degree when he or she knowingly and with intent to defraud assumes the identity of another person by presenting himself or herself as that other person, or by acting as that other person or by using personal identifying information of that other person, and thereby: 1. obtains goods, money, property or services or uses credit in the name of such other person in an aggregate amount that exceeds five hundred dollars; or 2. causes financial loss to

  18. Section 156.05 - Unauthorized use of a computer

    N.Y. Penal Law § 156.05   Cited 24 times

    A person is guilty of unauthorized use of a computer when he or she knowingly uses, causes to be used, or accesses a computer, computer service, or computer network without authorization. Unauthorized use of a computer is a class A misdemeanor. N.Y. Penal Law § 156.05

  19. Section 190.78 - Identity theft in the third degree

    N.Y. Penal Law § 190.78   Cited 22 times

    A person is guilty of identity theft in the third degree when he or she knowingly and with intent to defraud assumes the identity of another person by presenting himself or herself as that other person, or by acting as that other person or by using personal identifying information of that other person, and thereby: 1. obtains goods, money, property or services or uses credit in the name of such other person or causes financial loss to such person or to another person or persons; or 2. commits a class

  20. Section 170.35 - Criminal possession of a forged instrument; no defense

    N.Y. Penal Law § 170.35   Cited 11 times

    In any prosecution for criminal possession of a forged instrument, it is no defense that the defendant forged or participated in the forgery of the instrument in issue; provided that a person may not be convicted of both criminal possession of a forged instrument and forgery with respect to the same instrument. N.Y. Penal Law § 170.35