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Lubitz v. Wells

Superior Court, New London County
Mar 23, 1955
113 A.2d 147 (Conn. Super. Ct. 1955)

Summary

In Lubitz v. Wells, 19 Conn.Sup. 322 (1955), the Court held that, "it would hardly be good sense to hold that this golf club is so obviously and intrinsically dangerous that it is neglect to leave it lying on the ground in the yard."

Summary of this case from Debassio v. Moscato

Opinion

File No. 22595

A golf club is not so intrinsically dangerous that it is negligence to leave it lying on the ground. The complaint failed to state a cause of action against the named defendant by alleging his negligence in that, although he knew his golf club was lying in his yard and that his children would play with it and although he should have known that its negligent use by children would cause injury, he did not remove it or caution his eleven-year-old son against its use.

Memorandum filed March 23, 1955.

Memorandum on demurrer of defendant James Wells. Demurrer sustained.

Sachs, Sachs Sachs, of New Haven, for the plaintiff.

Brown, Jewett Driscoll, of Norwich, for the defendants.


The complaint alleges that James Wells was the owner of a golf club and that he left it for some time lying on the ground in the backyard of his home. That thereafter his son, the defendant James Wells, Jr., aged eleven years, while playing in the yard with the plaintiff, Judith Lubitz, aged nine years, picked up the golf club and proceeded to swing at a stone lying on the ground. In swinging the golf club, James Wells, Jr., caused the club to strike the plaintiff about the jaw and chin.

Negligence alleged against the young Wells boy is that he failed to warn his little playmate of his intention to swing the club and that he did swing the club when he knew she was in a position of danger.

In an attempt to hold the boy's father, James Wells, liable for his son's action, it is alleged that James Wells was negligent because although he knew the golf club was on the ground in his backyard and that his children would play with it, and that although he knew or "should have known" that the negligent use of the golf club by children would cause injury to a child, he neglected to remove the golf club from the backyard or to caution James Wells, Jr., against the use of the same.

The demurrer challenges the sufficiency of the allegations of the complaint to state a cause of action or to support a judgment against the father, James Wells.

It would hardly be good sense to hold that this golf club is so obviously and intrinsically dangerous that it is negligence to leave it lying on the ground in the yard. The father cannot be held liable on the allegations of this complaint. Goldberger v. David Roberts Corporation, 139 Conn. 629; Wood v. O'Neil, 90 Conn. 497-500.


Summaries of

Lubitz v. Wells

Superior Court, New London County
Mar 23, 1955
113 A.2d 147 (Conn. Super. Ct. 1955)

In Lubitz v. Wells, 19 Conn.Sup. 322 (1955), the Court held that, "it would hardly be good sense to hold that this golf club is so obviously and intrinsically dangerous that it is neglect to leave it lying on the ground in the yard."

Summary of this case from Debassio v. Moscato
Case details for

Lubitz v. Wells

Case Details

Full title:JUDITH LUBITZ v. JAMES WELLS ET AL

Court:Superior Court, New London County

Date published: Mar 23, 1955

Citations

113 A.2d 147 (Conn. Super. Ct. 1955)
113 A.2d 147

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