271 Cited authorities

  1. Apprendi v. New Jersey

    530 U.S. 466 (2000)   Cited 21,645 times   100 Legal Analyses
    Holding that “[o]ther than the fact of a prior conviction, any fact that increases the penalty for a crime beyond the prescribed statutory maximum must be submitted to a jury, and proved beyond a reasonable doubt”
  2. Blakely v. Washington

    542 U.S. 296 (2004)   Cited 14,033 times   17 Legal Analyses
    Holding that “[w]hen a judge inflicts punishment that the jury's verdict alone does not allow, the jury has not found all the facts ‘which the law makes essential to the punishment,’ and the judge exceeds his proper authority”
  3. Jackson v. Virginia

    443 U.S. 307 (1979)   Cited 68,412 times   16 Legal Analyses
    Holding that court must presume trier of fact resolved all inferences in favor of the prosecution "even if it does not affirmatively appear in the record"
  4. Estelle v. McGuire

    502 U.S. 62 (1991)   Cited 15,546 times   9 Legal Analyses
    Holding that federal habeas courts cannot review state court applications of state procedural rules
  5. Ring v. Arizona

    536 U.S. 584 (2002)   Cited 4,515 times   51 Legal Analyses
    Holding that “[i]f a State makes an increase in a defendant's authorized punishment contingent on the finding of a fact, that fact—no matter how the State labels it—must be found by a jury beyond a reasonable doubt”
  6. Kyles v. Whitley

    514 U.S. 419 (1995)   Cited 5,940 times   36 Legal Analyses
    Holding that such a reasonable probability is shown "when the government’s evidentiary suppression undermines confidence in the outcome of the trial" (cleaned up)
  7. Roper v. Simmons

    543 U.S. 551 (2005)   Cited 2,636 times   38 Legal Analyses
    Holding that death sentences for juveniles are unconstitutional
  8. Chapman v. California

    386 U.S. 18 (1967)   Cited 18,552 times   27 Legal Analyses
    Holding that error is harmless only if "harmless beyond a reasonable doubt"
  9. Atkins v. Virginia

    536 U.S. 304 (2002)   Cited 2,702 times   54 Legal Analyses
    Holding that the execution of mentally retarded offenders violates the Eighth Amendment
  10. Arizona v. Fulminante

    499 U.S. 279 (1991)   Cited 4,522 times   21 Legal Analyses
    Holding that the doctrine of harmless error applies to the violation of the defendant’s Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination through the admission at trial of an involuntary confession