Last time, we reviewed the data on the origin counties for the Supreme Court’s criminal cases from the Fifth Appellate District from 1990 to 2004. Today, we’re looking at the data for the years 2005 to 2019.

The Court’s flow of criminal cases from the Fifth District has slowed somewhat in recent years. In 2005, the Court decided one case each from Clinton, Madison, Saline and St. Clair counties. In 2006, the Court decided one case each from Marion and Williamson counties. The Court decided no criminal cases from the Fifth District in 2007, 2008 or 2009.

The Court decided one criminal case from the Fifth District in 2010 (Fayette county) and one in 2011 (St. Clair county). The Court had no Fifth District cases in 2012. The Court decided one case from Jackson county in 2013. In 2014, the Court decided two cases from Randolph county and one each from Marion, Perry and St. Clair counties.

The Court decided one criminal case each from Jefferson and St. Clair counties in 2015. In 2016, the Court decided one case each from Hamilton, Johnson, Madison and St. Clair counties. In 2017, the Court decided one case from Effingham county, one from Madison and one from St. Clair. The Court decided no criminal cases from the Fifth in 2018 and has decided none so far in 2019.

Finally, we compare each county’s share of the total population of the Fifth District counties to each county’s share of the civil caseload and the criminal caseload.

As we showed last week, St. Clair and Madison were 1-2 in their total contribution to the civil caseload. The same counties are at the top of the criminal caseload, but they’re switched places: Madison county has produced 24% of the criminal cases and St. Clair has produced 21.33. The rest of the cases are distributed across many counties, with four accounting for 5.33% of the cases each: Effingham, Jackson, Randolph and Williamson. Twelve counties in the Fifth District have produced no criminal cases at the Supreme Court since 1990: Bond, Christian, Clay, Crawford, Edwards, Franklin, Gallatin, Hardin, Jasper, Lawrence, Monroe and White.

Join us back here next week as we turn our attention to a new topic.

Image courtesy of Flickr by David Ohmer (no changes).