“The Cost to the Health of Our Microbial Ecosystems”

Gina Kolata has another good read at the NYTimes in "The New Generation of Microbe Hunters". The word, as you can see, is quickly getting out; the old ways of thinking about the determinants of human health are crumbling as the discovery that we are "super-organisms", more bacterial than human – at least from a genetic perspective, sweeps away old notions about what makes us sick, what keeps us healthy and even what (and maybe who) we are.

For other dispatches from the revolution you might want to read about just how big a deal this is, how much we know, how much remains to be understood and the promise of biotherapeutics; or maybe, since there’s a little Gilgamesh in each of us, how changing the bacteria in the gut of mice makes the rodents live significantly longer; then there’s a dysregulated microbiome and rheumatoid arthritis; new insights into how H. pylori causes gastric cancer; and gut microbes can cause cancer of the liver and breast (in mice anyway); and changing the gut microbiota to treat type 2 diabetes and, and, and … There’s a torrent of literature but that’ll give you an idea what’s out there and what’s coming.

None of that is to say "Eureka!" they’ve found the answer. Likely (as it’s wise to hedge bets) the causation onion has many layers still uncovered. No, the point is twofold. First, the 40 year old idea championed by public health advocates pushing what they call social, or environmental, justice – that much if not most human suffering is due to bad industrial chemicals or the bad habits inculcated in consumers by nefarious corporations bent on selling them things they don’t want or need – was never sound but now it’s just silly. Second, if you’ve been paying attention, you’ll understand that an awful lot of illness and suffering has been caused by stuff nobody, we presume, ever fretted about. But who knows? Maybe somebody somewhere has the disrupted microbiome version of the Sumner Simpson Papers. Wouldn’t that be something?