Senate Passes Leahy-Grassley Bill To Protect Whistleblowers in Criminal Antitrust Cases

Written November 6, 2013 by Robert Lu

On Monday night, November 4, 2013, the Senate unanimously passed bipartisan legislation to extend whistleblower protection for employees who provide information to the Department of Justice related to criminal antitrust violations.

The bill, introduced in January, allows employees who believe they are victims custom writing paper of retaliation to file complaints with the Department of Labor. Specifically, it allows employees who believe they are victims of retaliation to file complaints with the Secretary at the Department of Labor, and provides for those employees to be reinstated to their former status if the Secretary finds in their favor. U.S. Senators Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) authored similar whistleblower statutes as part of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act in 2002.

“Current law encourages self-reporting of criminal antitrust activity, yet it doesn’t provide any protections for innocent third-parties who blow the whistle on such activity. Our bill strengthens the enforcement of criminal antitrust laws by adding a civil remedy for antitrust whistleblowers who are retaliated against,” Sen. Grassley said.