Forbes: Do Food Trucks Have Fourth Amendment Rights? Supreme Court Could Decide In Chicago GPS Tracker Case

Forbes: Do Food Trucks Have Fourth Amendment Rights? Supreme Court Could Decide In Chicago GPS Tracker Case by Nick Sibilla:

One of the nation’s longest-running food fights could soon be headed to the U.S. Supreme Court. Under an ordinance meant to protect restaurants from competition, Chicago banned food trucks from vending within 200 feet of any restaurant, grocery store, and other brick-and-mortar establishments that sell food. In order to enforce that proximity ban, Chicago requires all food trucks to physically install a GPS tracker. Whenever a truck is on the clock, their location is transmitted to a third-party servicer, which retains the data for at least six months. City regulators can then access those records without a warrant.