An Expanding Universe of Healthcare Provider Liability: The United States Supreme Court Endorses “Implied False Certification” under the False Claims Act

An Expanding Universe of Healthcare Provider Liability: The United States Supreme Court Endorses “Implied False Certification” under the False Claims Act

By Jonathan Braunstein and Nabeel Ahmad

http://www.seyfarth.com/JonathanBraunstein

http://www.seyfarth.com/NabeelAhmad

Seyfarth Synopsis:

In Universal Health Services Inc. v. U.S. et al. ex rel. Escobar et al., the United States Supreme Court found a healthcare provider liable under the False Claims Act (“FCA”) for material omissions on its claim for payment because the claim made specific representations, and the provider’s failure to disclose its noncompliance with regulatory requirements made those representations misleading.

The Holding

On June 16, 2016, the Supreme Court considered and endorsed the “implied false certification” theory of liability under the False Claims Act. Specifically, the Supreme Court held a defendant may be liable for a material omission on a claim for payment if the claim makes specific representations, and the defendant’s failure to disclose its noncompliance with a statutory, regulatory, or contractual requirement renders those representations misleading. Going even further, the Supreme Court held that a defendant may be liable even if the requirement that the defendant did not comply with was not an express condition of payment.

The Underlying Facts

A beneficiary of a state Medicaid program received counseling services at a mental health facility owned and operated by Universal Health. The beneficiary died after suffering an adverse reaction to medication prescribed by the facility. After the beneficiary’s death, her guardians learned that the vast majority of the facility’s employees were not licensed or authorized to prescribe medication or offer counseling without supervision. The guardians filed a qui tam action against Universal Health alleging that it had violated the FCA under the “implied false certification theory” of liability.

The Supreme Court’s Analysis

In a unanimous decision written by Justice Thomas, the Supreme Court agreed with plaintiffs. First, the Supreme Court considered whether submitting a claim without disclosing violations of statutory, regulatory, or contractual requirements constituted an actionable misrepresentation under the FCA. Finding that it did, the Court wrote that by submitting claims for payment using payment codes corresponding to specific services, Universal Health represented that specific types of treatment were provided. The facility’s staff members made further representations by using National Provider Identification numbers corresponding to specific job titles. By conveying this information without disclosing the facility’s many violations, Universal Health’s claims constituted actionable misrepresentations.

Second, the Supreme Court considered Universal Health’s argument that FCA liability should be limited to undisclosed violations of express conditions of payment. The Court disagreed, and held that this argument was not supported by the text of the statute or the statute’s scienter requirement. According to the Court, a defendant can have actual knowledge that a condition is material even if not expressly designated as a condition of payment.

Third, the Supreme Court clarified the FCA’s materiality requirement and held that the Government’s decision to specify a provision as a condition of payment is relevant, but not dispositive. The Supreme Court noted that it is not sufficient for a finding of materiality that the Government would have declined to pay a claim if it knew of the defendant’s noncompliance. Materiality also cannot be found if the defendant’s noncompliance with statutory, contractual, or regulatory requirements is minor or insubstantial. Moreover, payment of a claim despite actual knowledge that certain requirements were violated is strong evidence that those requirements are not material. The Supreme Court vacated the First Circuit Court of Appeal’s ruling because its materiality standard was too broad.

Takeaway for ERISA plans: The Supreme Court’s Endorsement of Implied False Certification Liability Will Help ERISA Plans Defend Provider Collection Actions, Prosecute Overpayment Recovery Actions, and Deter Future Fraud

Although this case involved claims for payment under the FCA, the ruling is of great relevance and aid to ERISA plans. Claim submissions by providers to ERISA benefit plans often contain actionable material omissions and concealments akin to “implied false certifications” under the FCA.

If providers concealed material information on their claim submissions to ERISA benefit plans, they should not be able to recover allegedly owed but unpaid claims. The “implied certification” theory under the FCA can be cited by ERISA plans in support of affirmative defenses (such as unclean hands) to collection actions brought by providers.

Similarly, ERISA plans should be able to claw back overpayments induced by the providers’ material omissions and concealments. Fraudulent omissions, concealments and “implied false certifications” support claims by ERISA Plans under state law (see e.g., Cal. Civil Code 1710, sub. 3) to recover overpayments and offset future amounts owed.

Health care fraud, waste and abuse have a significant impact on our economy. Public agencies and private companies are focused on controlling costs and are increasing anti-fraud efforts. Hopefully, the Supreme Court’s decision will serve as a fraud deterrent going forward. We fully expect to see many more civil and criminal healthcare fraud and provider billing disputes involving “implied false certification” in the near future.